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In the news

Keine Abkürzung Erlaubt

By Tom Anderson, elektronik informationen

Funktionale Verifikation von IoT Chips. Um zuverlässig IoT-Produkte entwicklen zu können, ist eine umfassende Verifikation der Chips vonnöten. Abkürzungen können zu schwerwiegenden Fehlern führen, die sich beim Anwender nur mit großem Aufwand beheben lassen.

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Connectivity Checking Is A Perfect Fit For Formal Verification

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By Tom Anderson, Semiconductor Engineering

Formal verification has traditionally been regarded as an advanced technique for experts to thoroughly verify individual blocks of logic, or perhaps small clusters of blocks. However, if you talk to anyone involved in the field these days, you’ll find that the majority of formal users are running applications (“apps”) targeted for specific verification problems. Further, many of these apps, notably connectivity checking, are being run at the full-chip level on very large designs. We’d like to use this month’s post to explore the links between these two extremes, looking at what has changed and what is likely to happen going forward.

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EDA Grabs Bigger Slice Of Chip Market

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By Brian Bailey, Semiconductor Engineering

With new customers creating demand, and some traditional customers shifting focus from advanced nodes, the various branches of the EDA tool industry may be where sticky technical problems are solved. IC manufacturing, packaging and development tools all are finding new ways to handle the pressures that artificial intelligence, automation and security put on systems. But how long will this sweet spot last for EDA?

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Pushing AI Into The Mainstream

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By Brian Bailey, Semiconductor Engineering

Artificial intelligence is emerging as the driving force behind many advancements in technology, even though the industry has merely scratched the surface of what may be possible.

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Power Issues Rising For New Applications

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By Ann Steffora-Mutschler, Semiconductor Engineering

Managing power in chips is becoming more difficult across a wide range of applications and process nodes, forcing chipmakers and systems companies to rethink their power strategies and address problems much earlier than in the past.

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Mostly Upbeat Outlook For Chips

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By Brian Bailey, Semiconductor Engineering

Market segments such as cryptocurrencies and virtual reality are not living up to expectations, the market for smart phones appears to be saturated, and DRAM prices are dropping, leading to cut-backs in capital expenditures. EDA companies are talking about sales to China being put on hold in the shadow of a trade war between the United States and China. And there appears to be a slowdown in consumer electronics, as evidenced by Apple’s recent earnings and guidance.

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Taming Concurrency

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By Brian Bailey, Semiconductor Engineering

Concurrency adds complexity for which the industry lacks appropriate tools, and the problem has grown to the point where errors can creep into designs with no easy or consistent way to detect them.

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DACafe Industry Predictions for 2019 – OneSpin

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By Sergio Marchese, EDA Cafe

OneSpin sees two trends dominating the semiconductor and EDA industry for 2019. The first is that security and trust will start becoming key requirements for many applications. Prevention of hardware vulnerabilities and protection from attacks are essential to ensure safety, data privacy and availability of essential infrastructure. Today, this field is dominated by software, but it has become clear that hardware must play a bigger role in addressing this challenge. Similar to safety, where standards such as ISO 26262 and hardware safety mechanisms protect systems against systematic and random failures, we will see the emergence of security standards. They will prescribe strict hardware development processes in order to avoid vulnerabilities and hardware security mechanisms that protect electronic systems from adversary attacks.

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Press Contact

portrait of Nanette Collins

Nanette Collins
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